Minecraft: Regrowth – Couple Steps Forward, Couple Steps Back

I’m not sure what possessed me, but I spent most of the last few nights making the second level of my to-be modern farm looking pretty:

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The stairs down, courtesy of stone bricks stairs and stone brick slabs.

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The second floor with 12 crop beds in various stages of complete.

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The stairs leading down to the next floor, which has barely been dug out yet.

It took a frightening amount of time to decide on nice textures. As in, practically the whole night and then some.

The Chisel mod for Minecraft allows you to make common items like dirt and cobblestone and stone into other blocks with a vast array of textures.

There was a lot of stopping and starting and test-laying of “hrm, is this pretty?” blocks in a row, before I settled on Compressed Cobble-Dirt for the square frame marking the growing areas, and filling in the extra perimeter space with Polished Stone Bricks, lighter in color than regular Stone Bricks.

I actually hit a small watery alcove to the outside in the far corner, and decided not to brick it up entirely. Going to lay in some clear glass eventually and have a window that will let me see if it’s day or night.

The sprinkler system isn’t all the way in yet, but I extended the water tank into this layer and I -think- it will work.

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But then again, what do I know?

My old growing hall has finally hit a snag. Apparently, there is a limit to the horizontal distance that water will travel down these irrigation channels.

I painstakingly made Osmium Seeds the other night, which will eventually produce a metal I need for progressing further into the Mekanism mod. Only to discover that my sprinklers, well, aren’t sprinkling well.

The last sprinkler has a tendency to dry up and not sprinkle. That’s the sprinkler that’s supposed to speed the growth of the Osmium crop.

To make matters worse, checking on the water tank outside revealed that the water was getting sucked out faster than the one poor pump could replace.

I tried a stopgap measure of stacking the wooden tank blocks up to make a bigger water tank, and replacing the piping with a Mekanism pipe with better flow rate (all the better to drown you with, my dear):

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I seem to have made matters worse. The water just whooshes out of the water tank now.

Apparently growing some 50+ crop types with two sprinklers per crop goes through a high water volume. Who’d have thunk?

I am now debating with myself if it’s worth making a few more pumps to see if I can refill the water tank fast enough.

The alternative is figuring out whatever clever means of redstone or Buildcraft programming is available in this mod to shut the irrigation channel valve periodically, say, whenever the water tank is empty, so that the pump can fill it, and to open the valve to activate the sprinkler system when the tank is full.

Or it could make my head hurt and I’d say fuck it and use the manual route of accomplishing the same thing. Which is to just flip the lever that is currently next to the irrigation channel valve on and off, whenever I walk by or want to regrow some crops after harvesting. (After all, it is a bit of a waste to have it always-on when I barely harvest any crops most of the time.)

Either way, it’s still not going to solve the issue of reach, though.

So the other solution is to make a secondary water tank somewhere in the middle of the growing hall, and maybe install a pump system to fill -that- tank up. Maybe that’ll take some of the pressure off.

Who knows. The only thing I do know is that it’s going to take more than one night to resolve.

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The really casual bee breeding continues. I extended out the platform to accommodate more Apiaries.

After perplexing myself with one too many hybrid bees, I managed to force myself to sit (or fast-forward) through a few longwinded Youtube tutorial videos.

While I still don’t really have a clue as to the more industrial, automated parts of bee breeding yet, my take home was that if I was going to climb up to more sophisticated bees, I was going to need some hives producing pure stocks of the lower-rung bees.

So that’s what I’ve been trying to do. For every variant of bee currently in my possession, trying to force them to breed true to each other. And then using a few of those spare bees in crossbreeding attempts to get them to the next rung of bee tiers.

It is still not terribly easy going.

Mostly because Princesses and Queens are limited, I think. As far as I can figure out, you have to pull these breeder bees from wild hives, and I’ve depleted every wild hive in a fairly large radius around my base already.

If I want a pure breeding stock of one line, that’s one Princess/Queen dedicated to the job. That means no more Princess/Queen to crossbreed into another line.

Then I have to breed/mutate a new Princess/Queen up to the same level in order to crossbreed beyond…

…unless I’m missing something. Which I could very well be.

Oh well, live and learn.

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3 thoughts on “Minecraft: Regrowth – Couple Steps Forward, Couple Steps Back

  1. Isey says:

    Madness, really.

    Amazing that Minecraft makes these sorts of self created puzzles a lot of fun to sort through. Plus, bringing out the internal Interior Designer in you =P

  2. Cori says:

    Well this is super awesome. I haven’t spent a lot of time on Minecraft. My son likes to play it on his Nabi and laptop, but I mostly play RPGs even though I do like a good sim. Every time I see these amazing things people make I tell myself I should make time to get into it, but I worry it’ll suck up a lot of my spare time!

    • Jeromai says:

      It’s a really fun time suck though! 😉

      Singleplayer Minecraft is pretty low stress because the world only lives when you decide to play it, as opposed to those existing on servers. My Regrowth world lay fallow for 6 months until I decided last week that now would be a good time to play again.

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